Stuff.

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Beetletoes, Dec 4, 2015.

  1. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  2. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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  3. Enkiduu

    Enkiduu Looming

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    stuff
    /stəf/
    noun
    1. matter, material, articles, or activities of a specified or indeterminate kind that are being referred to, indicated, or implied.
      "a pickup truck picked the stuff up"
      synonyms: material, fabric, cloth, textile; More
    2. the basic constituents or characteristics of something or someone.
      "Healey was made of sterner stuff"
    verb
    1. fill (a receptacle or space) tightly with something.
      "an old teapot stuffed full of cash"
      synonyms: fill, pack, pad, upholster
      "stuffing pillows"
     
  4. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  5. Legoclub22

    Legoclub22 Cyclically Inactive

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    [​IMG]

    F O R B I D D E N C O C K T A I L
     
  6. Beetletoes

    Beetletoes Kazoologist

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    mastetvas e nae
     
  7. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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    Thoughts of the new page?
     
    #9887 Q1ntum_shot, Nov 25, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  8. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  9. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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    Profile picture* fucking auto correct
     
  10. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Teleportation is cool
     
  11. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    I would choose teleporting as a superpower
     
  12. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  13. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    I’d choose a really mediocre superpower
     
  14. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Because if I had an OP superpower, I’d probably get bored of being better than everyone.
     
  15. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    I like relishing in mediocrity.
     
  16. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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    Meh I’d have a Teleport that only works as long as I can see the location in real life
     
  17. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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    I know what I’m putting on corrupt a wish!
     
  18. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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  19. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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  20. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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  21. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  22. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  23. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  24. Legoclub22

    Legoclub22 Cyclically Inactive

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  25. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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    We counting down?
    Okay
    95 to go
     
  26. Beetletoes

    Beetletoes Kazoologist

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    almost there. i feel i should do something memorable for the 10k post but idk what to put
     
  27. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  28. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Jk please don’t
     
  29. Legoclub22

    Legoclub22 Cyclically Inactive

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    Somethin' kewl like aaaaaaaaaaa memory post or timeline or something?
    You could also just have one of the best memes of the year up there
     
  30. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Just dox yourself and we can all meet up
     
    • Powerful Powerful x 1
  31. Legoclub22

    Legoclub22 Cyclically Inactive

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    reveal yourself as the hacker for chan
     
  32. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Beet should dye his hair pink
     
  33. DankDan

    DankDan The Forgotten one

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    Ded
     
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  34. Q1ntum_shot

    Q1ntum_shot That guy with a top hat

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    Why not?
     
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  35. Beetletoes

    Beetletoes Kazoologist

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    1. my hair is thicc and long as fuck and it'd take gallons to dye it
    2. i don't wanna
     
    • Powerful Powerful x 1
  36. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  37. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Did you guys ask for the spec for my computing course?
     
  38. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  39. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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  40. RejectedNerd74

    RejectedNerd74 Cowardly Kathar | Manic Midget | Stagman

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    Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing Specification First teaching from September 2016 First certification from 2018 Issue 4 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing Specification First teaching September 2016 Issue 4 Edexcel, BTEC and LCCI qualifications Edexcel, BTEC and LCCI qualifications are awarded by Pearson, the UK’s largest awarding body offering academic and vocational qualifications that are globally recognised and benchmarked. For further information, please visit our qualifications website at qualifications.pearson.com. Alternatively, you can get in touch with us using the details on our contact us page at qualifications.pearson.com/contactusAbout Pearson Pearson is the world's leading learning company, with 35,000 employees in more than 70 countries working to help people of all ages to make measurable progress in their lives through learning. We put the learner at the centre of everything we do, because wherever learning flourishes, so do people. Find out more about how we can help you and your learners at qualifications.pearson.com This specification is Issue 4. Key changes are sidelined. We will inform centres of any changes to this issue. The latest issue can be found on our website. References to third-party material made in this specification are made in good faith. We do not endorse, approve or accept responsibility for the content of materials, which may be subject to change, or any opinions expressed therein. (Material may include textbooks, journals, magazines and other publications and websites.) ISBN 978 1 446 95128 6 All the material in this publication is copyright © Pearson Education Limited 2015 Welcome With a track record built over 30 years of learner success, BTEC Nationals are widely recognised by industry and higher education as the signature vocational qualification at Level 3. They provide progression to the workplace either directly or via study at a higher level. Proof comes from YouGov research, which shows that 62% of large companies have recruited employees with BTEC qualifications. What’s more, well over 100,000 BTEC students apply to UK universities every year and their BTEC Nationals are accepted by over 150 UK universities and higher education institutes for relevant degree programmes either on their own or in combination with A Levels. Why are BTECs so successful? BTECs embody a fundamentally learner-centred approach to the curriculum, with a flexible, unit-based structure and knowledge applied in project-based assessments. They focus on the holistic development of the practical, interpersonal and thinking skills required to be able to succeed in employment and higher education. When creating the BTEC Nationals in this suite, we worked with many employers, higher education providers, colleges and schools to ensure that their needs are met. Employers are looking for recruits with a thorough grounding in the latest industry requirements and work-ready skills such as teamwork. Higher education needs students who have experience of research, extended writing and meeting deadlines. We have addressed these requirements with: • a range of BTEC sizes, each with a clear purpose, so there is something to suit each learner’s choice of study programme and progression plans • refreshed content that is closely aligned with employers’ and higher education needs for a skilled future workforce • assessments and projects chosen to help learners progress to the next stage. This means some are set by you to meet local needs, while others are set and marked by Pearson so that there is a core of skills and understanding that is common to all learners. For example, a written test can be used to check that learners are confident in using technical knowledge to carry out a certain job. We are providing a wealth of support, both resources and people, to ensure that learners and their teachers have the best possible experience during their course. See Section 10 for details of the support we offer. A word to learners Today’s BTEC Nationals are demanding, as you would expect of the most respected applied learning qualification in the UK. You will have to choose and complete a range of units, be organised, take some assessments that we will set and mark, and keep a portfolio of your assignments. But you can feel proud to achieve a BTEC because, whatever your plans in life – whether you decide to study further, go on to work or an apprenticeship, or set up your own business – your BTEC National will be your passport to success in the next stage of your life. Good luck, and we hope you enjoy your course. Collaborative development Students completing their BTEC Nationals in Computing will be aiming to go on to employment, often via the stepping stone of higher education. It was, therefore, essential that we developed these qualifications in close collaboration with experts from professional bodies, businesses and universities, and with the providers who will be delivering the qualifications. To ensure that the content meets providers’ needs and provides high-quality preparation for progression, we engaged experts. We are very grateful to all the university and further education lecturers, teachers, employers, professional body representatives and other individuals who have generously shared their time and expertise to help us develop these new qualifications. BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, recognise that these qualifications are fit for purpose with regard to progression towards a professional career in IT or towards continuing education in Information Technology. In addition, universities, professional bodies and businesses have provided letters of support confirming that these qualifications meet their entry requirements. These letters can be viewed on our website. Summary of Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing specification Issue 3 and 4 changes Summary of changes made between previous issues and this current issue Page number Inclusion of Near Pass grade information for External assessments. Inclusion of text to further clarify Synoptic assessment Throughout Wording has been added to the Qualification and unit content section to clarify that references in units to regulation, legislation, policies and regulatory/standards organisations can be adapted and updated to reflect changes and variations within the UK. Page 7 The wording under the synoptic assessment section has been revised to reference synoptic assessment tasks within units. Page 8 A sentence has been added to the External assessment summary table to clarify the percentage of external assessment within the qualification. Page 13 Wording has been revised to reference the specific synoptic assessment task/s within units that have been identified for this qualification. Page 13 Wording has been revised in the Links to other units section in Units 1, 3, 4, 7, 10, 20 and 24. Pages 28, 50, 60, 70, 101, 207 and 247 Example tables in Section 9 have been updated to reflect the Near Pass grade. Section 9 If you need further information on these changes or what they mean, contact us via our website at: qualifications.pearson.com/en/support/contact-us.html. Contents Introduction to BTEC National qualifications for the computing sector 1 Total Qualification Time 2 Qualifications, sizes and purposes at a glance 3 Structures of the qualifications at a glance 5 Qualification and unit content 7 Assessment 7 Grading for units and qualifications 9 UCAS Tariff points 9 1 Qualification purpose 10 2 Structure 12 3 Units 14 Understanding your units 14 Index of units 17 4 Planning your programme 249 5 Assessment structure and external assessment 251 Introduction 251 Internal assessment 251 External assessment 251 6 Internal assessment 254 Principles of internal assessment 254 Setting effective assignments 256 Making valid assessment decisions 258 Planning and record keeping 260 7 Administrative arrangements 261 Introduction 261 Learner registration and entry 261 Access to assessment 261 Administrative arrangements for internal assessment 262 Administrative arrangements for external assessment 263 Dealing with malpractice in assessment 265 Certification and results 267 Additional documents to support centre administration 267 8 Quality assurance 268 9 Understanding the qualification grade 269 10 Resources and support 275 Support for setting up your course and preparing to teach 275 Support for teaching and learning 276 Support for assessment 276 Training and support from Pearson 277 Appendix 1 Links to industry standards 279 Appendix 2 Glossary of terms used for internally-assessed units 280 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 1 Introduction to BTEC National qualifications for the computing sector This specification contains the information you need to deliver the Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing. The specification signposts you to additional handbooks and policies. It includes all the units for this qualification. This is part of the suite of Computing qualifications offered by Pearson. In the suite there are qualifications that focus on different progression routes, allowing learners to choose the one best suited to their aspirations. All qualifications in the suite share some common units and assessments, allowing learners some flexibility in moving between sizes. The qualification titles are given below. Some BTEC National qualifications provide a broad introduction that gives learners transferable knowledge and skills. These qualifications are for post-16 learners who want to continue their education through applied learning. The qualifications prepare learners for a range of higher education courses and job roles related to a particular sector. They provide progression either by meeting entry requirements in their own right or by being accepted alongside other qualifications at the same level and adding value to them. In the computing sector these qualifications are: Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Certificate in Computing (180 GLH) 603/0446/7 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Computing (360 GLH) 601/7341/5Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma in Computing (510 GLH) 601/7343/9 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Computing (720 GLH) 603/0445/5 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing (1080 GLH) 601/7342/7. Some BTEC National qualifications are for post-16 learners wishing to specialise in a specific industry, occupation or occupational group. The qualifications give learners specialist knowledge and skills, enabling entry to an Apprenticeship or other employment, or progression to related higher education courses. Learners taking these qualifications must have a significant level of employer involvement in their programmes. In the computing sector these qualifications are: Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Computer Science (720 GLH) 601/7338/5Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Computing for Creative Industries (720 GLH) 601/7340/3 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Computer Systems and Network Support (720 GLH) 601/7339/7 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Business Information Systems (720 GLH) 601/7337/3. This specification signposts all the other essential documents and support that you need as a centre in order to deliver, assess and administer the qualification, including the staff development required. A summary of all essential documents is given in Section 7. Information on how we can support you with this qualification is given in Section 10. The information in this specification is correct at the time of publication. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 2 Total Qualification Time For all regulated qualifications, Pearson specifies a total number of hours that it is estimated learners will require to complete and show achievement for the qualification: this is the Total Qualification Time (TQT). Within TQT, Pearson identifies the number of Guided Learning Hours (GLH) that we estimate a centre delivering the qualification might provide. Guided learning means activities, such as lessons, tutorials, online instruction, supervised study and giving feedback on performance, that directly involve teachers and assessors in teaching, supervising and invigilating learners. Guided learning includes the time required for learners to complete external assessment under examination or supervised conditions. In addition to guided learning, other required learning directed by teachers or assessors will include private study, preparation for assessment and undertaking assessment when not under supervision, such as preparatory reading, revision and independent research. BTEC Nationals have been designed around the number of hours of guided learning expected. Each unit in the qualification has a GLH value of 60, 90 or 120. There is then a total GLH value for the qualification. Each qualification has a TQT value. This may vary within sectors and across the suite depending on the nature of the units in each qualification and the expected time for other required learning. The following table shows all the qualifications in this sector and their GLH and TQT values. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 3 Qualifications, sizes and purposes at a glance Title Size and structure Summary purpose Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Certificate in Computing 180 GLH (235 TQT) Equivalent in size to 0.5 of an A Level. 2 units, both mandatory, of which 1 is external. Mandatory content (100%). External assessment (50%). This qualification is designed to be an introduction to the computing sector through applied learning. The qualification supports progression to higher education when taken as part of a programme of study that includes other vocational or general qualifications. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Computing 360 GLH (465 TQT) Equivalent in size to one A Level. 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (83%). External assessment (58%). This qualification is designed to support learners who are interested in learning about the computing sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in the computing sector. It is designed to be taken as part of a programme of study that includes other appropriate BTEC Nationals or A Levels. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma in Computing 510 GLH (670 TQT) Equivalent in size to 1.5 A Levels. 6 units of which 4 are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (76%). External assessment (41%). This qualification is designed to support learners who wish to study computing as a one-year, full-time course, or for those wishing to take it alongside another area of complementary or contrasting study, as part of a two-year, full-time study programme. If taken as part of a programme of study that includes other appropriate BTEC Nationals or A Levels, it supports progression to higher education. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Computing 720 GLH (960 TQT) Equivalent in size to two A Levels. 8 units of which 6 are mandatory and 3 are external. Mandatory content (83%). External assessment (46%). This qualification is designed to support learners who want an in-depth study of the computing sector as part of a 16–19 study programme. This programme may include other BTEC Nationals or A Levels to support progression to higher education courses in computing areas before entering employment. The additional qualification(s) studied allow learners either to give breadth to their study programme by choosing a contrasting subject, or to give it more focus by choosing a complementary subject. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing 1080 GLH (1435 TQT) Equivalent in size to three A Levels. 13 units of which 7 are mandatory and 4 are external. Mandatory content (67%). External assessment (42%). This qualification is designed to support learners who are interested in a two-year, full-time course that meets entry requirements for a course in computer-related study at higher education. The qualification enables learners to explore a choice of sector areas, enabling progression to either higher education or employment in the computing sector. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 4 Title Size and structure Summary purpose Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Computer Science 720 GLH (975 TQT) Equivalent in size to two A Levels. 10 units of which 6 are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (67%). External assessment (33%). This qualification is designed to support learners who want a strong core study of computer science to enable progression to roles in the computing industry or progression to higher education, with a focus on the computing sector. This qualification is designed to meet the Tech Bacc measure when studied alongside Level 3 mathematics and the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). Pearson BTEC National Diploma in Computing for Creative Industries 720 GLH (970 TQT) Equivalent in size to two A Levels. 10 units of which 6 are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (67%). External assessment (33%). This qualification is designed to support learners who want a strong core study of computer science to enable progression to roles in the computing industry or progression to higher education, with a focus on the computing sector. This qualification is designed to meet the Tech Bacc measure when studied alongside Level 3 mathematics and the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). Pearson BTEC National Diploma in Computer Systems and Network Support 720 GLH (995 TQT) Equivalent in size to two A Levels. 10 units of which all are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (100%). External assessment (33%). This qualification is designed to support learners who want a strong core study of computer science to enable progression to roles in the computing industry or progression to higher education, with a focus on the computing sector. This qualification is designed to meet the Tech Bacc measure when studied alongside Level 3 mathematics and the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). Pearson BTEC National Diploma in Business Information Systems 720 GLH (990 TQT) Equivalent in size to two A Levels. 10 units of which all are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (100%). External assessment (33%). This qualification is designed to support learners who want a strong core study of computer science to enable progression to roles in the computing industry or progression to higher education with a focus on the computing sector. This qualification is designed to meet the Tech Bacc measure when studied alongside Level 3 mathematics and the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 5 Structures of the qualifications at a glance This table shows all the units and the qualifications to which they contribute. The full structure for this Pearson BTEC Level 3 National in Computing is shown in Section 2. You must refer to the full structure to select units and plan your programme. Key Unit assessed externally M Mandatory units O Optional units CC Creative Computing CS Computer Science CSNS Computer Systems and Network Suppport BIS Business Information Systems Unit (number and title) Unit size (GLH) Certificate (180 GLH) Extended Certificate (360 GLH) Foundation Diploma (510 GLH) Diploma (720 GLH) Extended Diploma (1080 GLH) Diploma (720 GLH) CC CS CSNS BIS 1 Principles of Computer Science 120 M M M M M M M M 2 Fundamentals of Computer Systems 90 M M M M M 3 Planning and Management of Computing Projects 120 M M M M M M 4 Software Design and Development Project 120 M 5 Building Computer Systems 60 M M M M 6 IT Systems Security 60 M M M M 7 IT Systems Security and Encryption 90 M M M M M 8 Business Applications of Social Media 90 M M M 9 The Impact of Computing 90 M M 10 Human-computer Interaction 60 O O O O M O M 11 Digital Graphics and Animation 60 O O O O O 12 Digital Audio 60 O O O 13 Digital Video 60 O O O 14 Computer Games Development 60 O O O O O 15 Website Development 60 O O O O O O 16 Object-oriented Programming 60 O O O continued overleaf Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 6 Unit (number and title) Unit size (GLH) Certificate (180 GLH) Extended Certificate (360 GLH) Foundation Diploma (510 GLH) Diploma (720 GLH) Extended Diploma (1080 GLH) Diploma (720 GLH) CC CS CSNS BIS 17 Mobile Apps Development 60 O O O O O 18 Relational Database Development 60 O O O M 19 Computer Networking 60 O O 20 Managing and Supporting Systems 60 O O O O M 21 Virtualisation 60 O O M 22 Systems Analysis and Design 60 O O O O O M M 23 Systems Methodology 60 O O M 24 Software Developmet 60 M M 25 Web Application Development 60 O 26 Programmable Devices and Controllers 60 O M 27 3D Modelling 60 O 28 Computer Forensics 60 O M 29 Network Operating Systems 60 M 30 Communication Technologies 60 M 31 Large-scale Data Systems 60 M 32 Business Process Modelling Tools 60 M Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 7 Qualification and unit content Pearson has developed the content of the new BTEC Nationals in collaboration with employers and representatives from higher education and relevant professional bodies. In this way, we have ensured that content is up to date and that it includes the knowledge, understanding, skills and attributes required in the sector. Each qualification in the suite has its own purpose. The mandatory and optional content provides a balance of breadth and depth, while retaining a degree of choice for individual learners to study content relevant to their own interests and progression choices. Also, the content may be applied during delivery in a way that is relevant to local employment needs. The proportion of mandatory content ensures that all learners are following a coherent programme of study and acquiring the knowledge, understanding and skills that will be recognised and valued. Learners are expected to show achievement across mandatory units as detailed in Section 2. BTEC Nationals have always required applied learning that brings together knowledge and understanding (the cognitive domain) with practical and technical skills (the psychomotor domain). This is achieved through learners performing vocational tasks that encourage the development of appropriate vocational behaviours (the affective domain) and transferable skills. Transferable skills are those such as communication, teamwork, research and analysis, which are valued in both higher education and the workplace. Our approach provides rigour and balance, and promotes the ability to apply learning immediately in new contexts. Further details can be found in Section 2. Centres should ensure that delivery of content is kept up to date. In particular units may include reference to regulation, legislation, policies and regulatory/standards organisations. This is designed to provide guidance on breadth and depth of coverage and may be adjusted to update content and to reflect variations within the UK. Assessment Assessment is specifically designed to fit the purpose and objective of the qualification. It includes a range of assessment types and styles suited to vocational qualifications in the sector. There are three main forms of assessment that you need to be aware of: external, internal and synoptic. Externally-assessed units Each external assessment for a BTEC National is linked to a specific unit. All of the units developed for external assessment are of 90 or 120 GLH to allow learners to demonstrate breadth and depth of achievement. Each assessment is taken under specified conditions, then marked by Pearson and a grade awarded. Learners are permitted to resit external assessments during their programme. You should refer to our website for current policy information on permitted retakes. The styles of external assessment used for qualifications in the computing suite are: • examinations – all learners take the same assessment at the same time, normally with a written outcome • set tasks – learners take the assessment during a defined window and demonstrate understanding through completion of a vocational task. Some external assessments include a period of preparation using set information. External assessments are available once or twice a year. For detailed information on the external assessments please see the table in Section 2. For further information on preparing for external assessment see Section 5. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 8 Internally-assessed units Most units in the sector are internally assessed and subject to external standards verification. This means that you set and assess the assignments that provide the final summative assessment of each unit, using the examples and support that Pearson provides. Before you assess you will need to become an approved centre, if you are not one already. You will need to prepare to assess using the guidance in Section 6. In line with the requirements and guidance for internal assessment, you select the most appropriate assessment styles according to the learning set out in the unit. This ensures that learners are assessed using a variety of styles to help them develop a broad range of transferable skills. Learners could be given opportunities to: • write up the findings of their own research • use case studies to explore complex or unfamiliar situations • carry out projects for which they have choice over the direction and outcomes • demonstrate practical and technical skills using appropriate tools/processes etc. You will make grading decisions based on the requirements and supporting guidance given in the units. Learners may not make repeated submissions of assignment evidence. For further information see Section 6. Synoptic assessment Synoptic assessment requires learners to demonstrate that they can identify and use effectively, in an integrated way, an appropriate selection of skills, techniques, concepts, theories and knowledge from across the whole sector as relevant to a key task. BTEC learning has always encouraged learners to apply their learning in realistic contexts using scenarios and realistic activities that will permit learners to draw on and apply their learning. For these qualifications we have formally identified units which contain a synoptic assessment task. Synoptic assessment must take place after the teaching and learning of other mandatory units in order for learners to be able to draw from the full range of content. The synoptic assessment gives learners an opportunity to independently select and apply learning from across their programmes in the completion of a vocational task. Synoptic tasks may be in internally or externally assessed units. The particular unit that contains the synoptic tasks for this qualification is shown in the structure in Section 2. Language of assessment Assessment of the internal and external units for these qualifications will be available in English. All learner work must be in English. A learner taking the qualifications may be assessed in British or Irish Sign Language where it is permitted for the purpose of reasonable adjustment. For information on reasonable adjustments see Section 7. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 9 Grading for units and qualifications Achievement in the qualification requires a demonstration of depth of study in each unit, assured acquisition of a range of practical skills required for employment or progression to higher education, and successful development of transferable skills. Learners achieving a qualification will have achieved across mandatory units, including external and synoptic assessment. Units are assessed using a grading scale of Distinction (D), Merit (M), Pass (P), Near Pass (N) and Unclassified (U). The grade of Near Pass is used for externally-assessed units only. All mandatory and optional units contribute proportionately to the overall qualification grade, for example a unit of 120 GLH will contribute double that of a 60 GLH unit. Qualifications in the suite are graded using a scale of P to D*, or PP to D*D*, or PPP to D*D*D*. Please see Section 9 for more details. The relationship between qualification grading scales and unit grades will be subject to regular review as part of Pearson’s standards monitoring processes on the basis of learner performance and in consultation with key users of the qualification. UCAS Tariff points The BTEC Nationals attract UCAS points. Please go to the UCAS website for full details of the points allocated. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 10 1 Qualification purpose Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing In this section you will find information on the purpose of this qualification and how its design meets that purpose through the qualification objective and structure. We publish a full ‘Statement of Purpose’ for each qualification on our website. These statements are designed to guide you and potential learners to make the most appropriate choice about the size of qualification suitable at recruitment. The content of this qualification has been developed in consultation with academics to ensure that it incorporates the most up-to-date knowledge and skills to enable progression to higher education. In addition, employers and professional bodies have been consulted on the content development to corroborate its relevance with current industry practice used in computing and related occupational disciplines. Who is this qualification for? The Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing is equivalent in size to three A Levels and would normally be the only qualification in a learner’s study programme. It is designed to be offered to 16–19 learners who are interested in progressing to further study in higher education computing-related disciplines. The qualification provides learners with a broad base of knowledge of the computing sector. The optional units enable learners to explore their own choice of areas for further study. Learners could also progress to employment in the computing sector. What does this qualification cover? The objective of this qualification is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in managing networks, the design and development of websites, the development of databases and digital graphics and animation, enabling learners to progress to further study of the sector. Initially, learners study seven core units: • Unit 1: Principles of Computer Science • Unit 2: Fundamentals of Computer Systems • Unit 3: Planning and Management of Computer Projects • Unit 4: Software Design and Development Project – (Synoptic) • Unit 7: IT Systems Security and Encryption • Unit 8: Business Applications of Social Media • Unit 9: The Impact of Computing. The mandatory content is equivalent in size to three A Levels. Higher education representatives have confirmed that it is appropriate to allow learners a wide range of optional units in the final third of the qualification so that they can explore their own choice of areas for further study. The optional units have been designed to support progression to ICT courses and link with relevant sector areas such as creative, computer science, networking support systems, and business systems. What could this qualification lead to? In addition to the computing sector-specific content outlined above, the requirements of the qualification enables learners to develop the transferable and higher order skills which are highly regarded by higher education providers and employers. For example, the study of computing particularly encourages development of analysis skills, including investigating, categorising and prioritizing; the synthesis skills of adapting, constructing and integrating; and the evaluation skills of assessing, interpreting and validating. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 11 This qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers as meeting admission requirements to many relevant courses. The combination of the mandatory content and the optional units enables learners to explore a range of areas for further study, for example: • MSci or BSc (Hons) in Computer Science • BSc (Hons) in Information Technology Practitioner • BA (Hons) in Creative Digital Media • BSc (Hons) Business Information Systems • BSc (Hons) Computer Systems and Networks. Some university courses may require the achievement of specific units and learners should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes with specific higher education providers. This qualification has attracted support from the BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, as being fit for purpose with regard to progression towards a professional career in roles such as a software engineer, business analyst, systems analyst, network engineer, technical consultant, web developer and software tester. How does the qualification provide employability skills? In the BTEC National units there are opportunities during the teaching and learning phase to give learners practice in developing employability skills. Where employability skills are referred to in this specification, we are generally referring to skills in the following three main categories: • cognitive and problem-solving skills: use critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology • intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation • interpersonal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development. There are also specific requirements in some units for assessment of these skills where relevant. For example, where learners are required to undertake real or simulated activities. How does the qualification provide transferable knowledge and skills for higher education? All BTEC Nationals provide transferable knowledge and skills that prepare learners for progression to university. The transferable skills that universities value include: • the ability to learn independently • the ability to research actively and methodically • being able to give presentations and being active group members. BTEC learners can also benefit from opportunities for deep learning where they are able to make connections among units and select areas of interest for detailed study. BTEC Nationals provide a vocational context in which learners can develop the knowledge and skills required for particular degree courses, including: • reading technical texts • effective writing • analytical skills • creative development • preparation for assessment methods used in degrees. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 12 2 Structure Qualification structure Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing Mandatory units There are seven mandatory units, three internal and four external. Learners must complete and achieve at Near Pass grade or above in all mandatory external units and achieve a Pass or above in all mandatory internal units. Optional units Learners must complete six optional units. The optional units are grouped. Learners take a maximum of two units from any group. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing Unit number Unit title GLH Type How assessed Mandatory units – learners complete and achieve all units 1 Principles of Computer Science 120 Mandatory External 2 Fundamentals of Computer Systems 90 Mandatory External 3 Planning and Management of Computing Projects 120 Mandatory External 4 Software Design and Development Project 120 Mandatory and Synoptic External 7 IT Systems Security and Encryption 90 Mandatory Internal 8 Business Applications of Social Media 90 Mandatory Internal 9 The Impact of Computing 90 Mandatory Internal Optional units group A – learners complete 0 – 2 units 10 Human-computer Interaction 60 Optional Internal 11 Digital Graphics and Animation 60 Optional Internal 12 Digital Audio 60 Optional Internal 13 Digital Video 60 Optional Internal 14 Computer Games Development 60 Optional Internal Optional units group B – learners complete 0 – 2 units 15 Website Development 60 Optional Internal 16 Object-oriented Programming 60 Optional Internal 17 Mobile Apps Development 60 Optional Internal 18 Relational Database Development 60 Optional Internal Optional units group C – learners complete 0 – 2 units 19 Computer Networking 60 Optional Internal 20 Managing and Supporting Systems 60 Optional Internal 21 Virtualisation 60 Optional Internal Optional units group D – learners complete 0 – 2 units 22 Systems Analysis and Design 60 Optional Internal 23 Systems Methodology 60 Optional Internal Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 13 External assessment This is a summary of the type and availability of external assessment, which is of units making up 42% of the total qualification GLH. See Section 5 and the units and sample assessment materials for more information. Unit Type Availability Unit 1: Principles of Computer Science • Written examination set and marked by Pearson. • 90 marks. • Two hours. Jan and May/June. First assessment: May/June 2017 Unit 2: Fundamentals of Computer Systems • Written examination set and marked by Pearson. • 80 marks. • 1 hour and 45 minutes. Jan and May/June. First assessment: May/June 2017. Unit 3: Planning and Management of Computer Projects • A task set and marked by Pearson and completed under supervised conditions. • There are two supervised assessment periods. Part A is a maximum of three hours in a one week period and Part B is a maximum of two hours in a three day period. Both periods are timetabled by Pearson. • Completed using a computer and submitted electronically. • 66 marks. Dec/Jan and May/June First assessment: Dec/Jan 2018. Unit 4: Software Design and Development Project • A task set and marked by Pearson and completed under supervised conditions. • The supervised assessment period is a maximum of six hours and can be arranged over a number of sessions in a period timetabled by Pearson. • Completed using a computer and submitted electronically. • 68 marks. Dec/Jan and May/June First assessment: May/June 2018. Synoptic assessment The mandatory synoptic assessment requires learners to apply learning from across the qualification to the completion of a defined vocational task. Within the assessment for Unit 4: Software Design and Development Project learners complete a project applying the software development cycle to a computer problem. In delivering the unit you need to encourage learners to draw on their broader learning so they will be prepared for the assessment. Learners complete the task using knowledge and understanding from their studies of the sector and apply both transferable and specialist knowledge and skills. Employer involvement in assessment and delivery You are encouraged to give learners opportunities to be involved with employers. See Section 4 for more information. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 14 3 Units Understanding your units The units in this specification set out our expectations of assessment in a way that helps you to prepare your learners for assessment. The units help you to undertake assessment and quality assurance effectively. Each unit in the specification is set out in a similar way. There are two types of unit format: • internal units • external units. This section explains how the units work. It is important that all teachers, assessors, internal verifiers and other staff responsible for the programme review this section. Internal units Section Explanation Unit number The number is in a sequence in the sector. Numbers may not be sequential for an individual qualification. Unit title This is the formal title that we always use and it appears on certificates. Level All units are at Level 3 on the national framework. Unit type This shows if the unit is internal or external only. See structure information in Section 2 for full details. GLH Units may have a GLH value of 120, 90 or 60 GLH. This indicates the numbers of hours of teaching, directed activity and assessment expected. It also shows the weighting of the unit in the final qualification grade. Unit in brief A brief formal statement on the content of the unit that is helpful in understanding its role in the qualification. You can use this in summary documents, brochures etc. Unit introduction This is designed with learners in mind. It indicates why the unit is important, how learning is structured, and how learning might be applied when progressing to employment or higher education. Learning aims These help to define the scope, style and depth of learning of the unit. You can see where learners should be learning standard requirements (‘understand’) or where they should be actively researching (‘investigate’). You can find out more about the verbs we use in learning aims in Appendix 2. Summary of unit This new section helps teachers to see at a glance the main content areas against the learning aims and the structure of the assessment. The content areas and structure of assessment are required. The forms of evidence given are suitable to fulfil the requirements. Content This section sets out the required teaching content of the unit. Content is compulsory except when shown as ‘e.g.’. Learners should be asked to complete summative assessment only after the teaching content for the unit or learning aim(s) has been covered. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 15 Section Explanation Assessment criteria Each learning aim has Pass and Merit criteria. Each assignment has at least one Distinction criterion. A full glossary of terms used is given in Appendix 2. All assessors need to understand our expectations of the terms used. Distinction criteria represent outstanding performance in the unit. Some criteria require learners to draw together learning from across the learning aims. Essential information for assignments This shows the maximum number of assignments that may be used for the unit to allow for effective summative assessment, and how the assessment criteria should be used to assess performance. Further information for teachers and assessors The section gives you information to support the implementation of assessment. It is important that this is used carefully alongside the assessment criteria. Resource requirements Any specific resources that you need to be able to teach and assess are listed in this section. For information on support resources see Section 10. Essential information for assessment decisions This information gives guidance for each learning aim or assignment of the expectations for Pass, Merit and Distinction standard. This section contains examples and essential clarification. Links to other units This section shows you the main relationship among units. This section can help you to structure your programme and make best use of materials and resources. Employer involvement This section gives you information on the units that can be used to give learners involvement with employers. It will help you to identify the kind of involvement that is likely to be successful. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 16 External units Section Explanation Unit number The number is in a sequence in the sector. Numbers may not be sequential for an individual qualification. Unit title This is the formal title that we always use and it appears on certificates. Level All units are at Level 3 on the national framework. Unit type This shows if the unit is internal or external only. See structure information in Section 2 for full details. GLH Units may have a GLH value of 120, 90 or 60 GLH. This indicates the numbers of hours of teaching, directed activity and assessment expected. It also shows the weighting of the unit in the final qualification grade. Unit in brief A brief formal statement on the content of the unit. Unit introduction This is designed with learners in mind. It indicates why the unit is important, how learning is structured, and how learning might be applied when progressing to employment or higher education. Summary of assessment This sets out the type of external assessment used and the way in which it is used to assess achievement. Assessment outcomes These show the hierarchy of knowledge, understanding, skills and behaviours that are assessed. Includes information on how this hierarchy relates to command terms in sample assessment materials (SAMs). Essential content For external units all the content is obligatory, the depth of content is indicated in the assessment outcomes and sample assessment materials (SAMs). The content will be sampled through the external assessment over time, using the variety of questions or tasks shown. Grade descriptors We use grading descriptors when making judgements on grade boundaries. You can use them to understand what we expect to see from learners at particular grades. Key terms typically used in assessment These definitions will help you analyse requirements and prepare learners for assessment. Resources Any specific resources that you need to be able to teach and assess are listed in this section. For information on support resources see Section 10. Links to other units This section shows the main relationship among units. This section can help you to structure your programme and make best use of materials and resources. Employer involvement This section gives you information on the units that can be used to give learners involvement with employers. It will help you to identify the kind of involvement that is likely to be successful. Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 17 Index of units This section contains all the units developed for this qualification. Please refer to pages 5–6 to check which units are available in all qualifications in the computing sector. Unit 1: Principles of Computer Science 19 Unit 2: Fundamentals of Computer Systems 29 Unit 3: Planning and Management of Computing Projects 39 Unit 4: Software Design and Development Project 51 Unit 7: IT Systems Security and Encryption 61 Unit 8: Business Applications of Social Media 71 Unit 9: The Impact of Computing 81 Unit 10: Human-computer Interaction 91 Unit 11: Digital Graphics and Animation 103 Unit 12: Digital Audio 115 Unit 13: Digital Video 125 Unit 14: Computer Games Development 137 Unit 15: Website Development 149 Unit 16: Object-oriented Programming 159 Unit 17: Mobile Apps Development 169 Unit 18: Relational Database Development 179 Unit 19: Computer Networking 189 Unit 20: Managing and Supporting Systems 199 Unit 21: Virtualisation 209 Unit 22: Systems Analysis and Design 219 Unit 23: Systems Methodology 229 Unit 24: Software Development 237 Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 201 5 18 UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 19 Unit 1: Principles of Computer Science Level: 3 Unit type: External Guided learning hours: 120 Unit in brief This unit covers the principles that underpin all areas of computer science. It will develop your computational-thinking skills and you will apply those skills to solve problems. Unit introduction Problem solving is an essential skill in all areas of life. To be successful, professionals need to be able to analyse the needs of individuals and organisations, and to evaluate the suitability and effectiveness of current ways of working in order to develop solutions that improve or enhance processes and/or outcomes. In this unit, you will explore the logical and structured ways that computer systems process data to develop programs, processes and systems that solve specific problems. You will examine the features of effective computer programming and apply accepted computing and programming paradigms. You will analyse, develop and evaluate algorithms and computer code, and propose and apply solutions to ensure that computer systems are fit for purpose. To complete the assessment task within this unit, you will need to draw on your learning from across your programme. In this unit, you will develop the computational-thinking skills to effectively analyse a problem, break it down into its component parts, and design and evaluate solutions. These skills are required for progression to computing-related higher education courses or to the workplace as a computing professional. Summary of assessment This unit is assessed through a written examination set and marked by Pearson. The examination is two hours in length. During the supervised assessment period, learners will be assessed on their ability to apply their computational-thinking skills to solve problems. The number of marks for the unit is 90. The assessment availability is January and May/June each year. The first assessment availability is May/June 2017. Sample assessment materials will be available to help centres prepare learners for assessment. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 20 Assessment outcomes AO1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of computing facts, terms, standards, concepts and processes Command words: complete, draw, give, identify, name, state Marks: ranges from 1 to 5 marks AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding to communicate understanding of computing facts, terms, standards, concepts and processes Command words: calculate, complete, demonstrate, describe, draw, explain, produce Marks: ranges from 1 to 5 marks AO3 Select and use computing technologies and procedures to explore outcomes and find solutions to problems in context Command words: calculate, demonstrate, develop, explain, produce Marks: ranges from 1 to 6 marks AO4 Analyse data and information related to computer science in order to predict outcomes and present solutions Command words: analyse, demonstrate, discuss, produce, write Marks: ranges from 6 to 12 marks AO5 Evaluate technologies, procedures, outcomes and solutions to make reasoned judgements and make decisions Command words: evaluate, produce, write Marks: ranges from 6 to 12 marks UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 21 Essential content The essential content is set out under content areas. Learners must cover all specified content before the assessment. A Computational thinking Application of the thinking skills involved in analysing problems and processes, to identify solutions that can be developed into computer programs. A1 Decomposition • Identifying and describing problems and processes. • Breaking down problems and processes into distinct steps. • Describing problems and processes as a set of structured steps. • Communicating the key features of problems and processes to others. A2 Pattern recognition • Identifying common elements or features in problems or systems. • Identifying and interpreting common differences between processes or problems. • Identifying individual elements within problems. • Describing patterns that have been identified. • Making predictions based on identified patterns. A3 Pattern generalisation and abstraction • Identifying information that is necessary to solve an identified problem. • Filtering out information that is not needed to solve an identified problem. • Representing parts of a problem or system in general terms by identifying: o variables o constants o key processes o repeated processes o inputs o outputs. A4 Algorithm design • Describing a step-by-step strategy to solve a problem. B Standard methods and techniques used to develop algorithms Techniques used to design solutions to problems. B1 Structured English (pseudocode) Produce, apply and interpret pseudocode statements to describe computing tasks or processes and solve problems. • Interpreting pseudocode: o apply processes to calculate outcomes o evaluate the structure and logic of given code against given requirements o suggest improvements to logical structures and processes. • Developing pseudocode: o improve the effectiveness and efficiency of code o identify and fix errors within code. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 22 • Producing pseudocode – learners must be familiar with the listed terms and their application. Unfamiliar pseudocode will be given with definitions for application in the examination context: o sequence o structure: – hierarchy – indentation o operations: – BEGIN – END – INPUT – OUTPUT – PRINT – READ – WRITE o decisions: – IF – THEN – ELSE – ELSEIF (ELIF) – WHEN o repetition: – FOR – REPEAT UNTIL – WHILE – WHILE NOT. B2 Flowcharts using standard symbols Interpret, produce and develop flowcharts using appropriate British Computer Society (BCS) symbols to describe a system or solution. • Process. • Decisions. • Input/output. • Connectors. • Start/end. C Programming paradigms Use of standard structures and conventions to build and develop accurate, efficient and effective computer code to fulfil identified criteria and solve problems. C1 Handling data within a program Selecting, applying, using and interpreting common data-handling techniques and structures provided within programming languages to process data. • Defining and declaring constants and variables: o alphanumeric strings o arrays o Boolean o characters o date/time o floating point (real) o integers o objects o records o sets o strings. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 23 • Managing variables: o local and global variables o naming conventions. C2 Arithmetic operations Selecting, applying, using and interpreting general mathematical expressions within computing structures to process data. • Mathematical operators: o + o – o / (DIV) o * o %/MOD/modulo/rem. • Relational operators (=, <, >, <>, <=, >=). • Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR). • Date/time. C3 Built-in functions Selecting, applying, using and interpreting common functions provided within programming languages to perform specific tasks to process data. • Arithmetic functions: o random o range o round o truncation. • String handling functions: o concatenation o length o position o string conversion: – integer/float to string – string to integer/float. • General functions: o input o open o print o range. C4 Validating data Selecting, applying, using and interpreting validation techniques to analyse and improve the accuracy and validity of data. • Validation check techniques: o data type o range o constraints o Boolean. • Post-check actions. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 24 C5 Control structures Selecting, applying, using and interpreting common programming control structures to analyse and improve the effectiveness of code. • Loops: o REPEAT o FOR o WHILE o BREAK. • Branches: o IF o THEN o ELSE o ELSEIF (ELIF). • Function calls: o defining functions o declaring arguments o calling functions. C6 Data structures Selecting, applying, using and interpreting common data structures within a computer program to store and process data. • Lists. • Arrays: o single dimensional arrays o multi-dimensional arrays. • Records. • Sets. C7 Common/standard algorithms Selecting, applying, using and interpreting standard algorithms within a computer program to store and process data. • Sorting: o bubble sort o quick sort o insertion sort. • Searching: o serial/linear search o binary search. • Other standard algorithms: o count occurrences o input validation. • Using stacks and queues to implement sorting and searching: o Last In First Out (LIFO) o First In First Out (FIFO). UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 25 D Types of programming and mark-up languages The features, applications, impact and implications of using programming and mark-up languages (C family, Visual Basic, HTML5 or subsequent version, Python 3.4 or subsequent version) to develop code. D1 Procedural programming • Interpret, analyse and evaluate the use of code written using procedural programming paradigms in terms of: o structure: – statements – blocks – procedures – functions/sub-routines o control structures: – sequence – conditional – iterative. • Interpret, debug and use code written using procedural paradigms. D2 Object-orientated programming • Interpret, analyse and evaluate the use of code written using object orientated programming paradigms in terms of: o structure: – classes – objects/instances o features: – inheritance – encapsulation – polymorphism and overloading – data hiding – reusability. • Interpret, debug and use code written in Python 3.4 or subsequent version and C family derived. D3 Event driven programming • Interpret, analyse and evaluate the use of code written using event driven programming paradigms in terms of: o structure: – main loop – callback function – sub-routines o features: – events – event handlers – event loops – service orientated processing – time driven – trigger functions. • Interpret, debug and use code written in Visual Basic. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 26 D4 Coding for the web Interpret, analyse and evaluate the use of code written for web languages in terms of: • the characteristics, features and implications of mark-up and web languages in relation to: o performance o platform independence o power o protocols o security • the uses, applications and implications of mark-up and web languages • interpret, debug, and use code in the mark-up language HTML5 • the uses, applications and implications of client side processing and scripting • the uses, applications and implications of server side processing and scripting • issues and implications of implementing code on a web platform. D5 Translation The issues and implications of translating code between programming languages including: • reasons for translating code from one language to another • benefits of translating code from one language to another • drawbacks of translating code from one language to another • the implications of translating code and the impact on: o users o organisations o developers • alternative ways to implement current code base. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 27 Grade descriptors To achieve a grade a learner is expected to demonstrate these attributes across the essential content of the unit. The principle of best fit will apply in awarding grades. Level 3 Pass Learners are able to use problem-solving skills to develop a solution to given problems in context. Learners use standard programming constructs to demonstrate an understanding of how data is handled in a computer program. Learners are able to construct, propose, develop and explain solutions to a problem and demonstrate an understanding of data validation and error checking. Level 3 Distinction Learners are able to analyse and interpret given problems and develop a detailed and complex solution in response. Learners demonstrate an in-depth understanding of programming constructs and a thorough understanding of how data is handled in a computer program. Key terms typically used in assessment The following table shows the key terms that will be used consistently by Pearson in our assessments to ensure students are rewarded for demonstrating the necessary skills. Please note: the list below will not necessarily be used in every paper/session and is provided for guidance only. Command or term Definition Analyse Learners examine in detail, a scenario or problem to discover its meaning or essential features. Learners will break down the problem into its parts and show how they interrelate. There is no requirement for any conclusion. Calculate Learners apply some form of mathematical or computational process. Complete Learners complete a diagram or process. Can apply to problems/solutions of varying complexity. Demonstrate Learners illustrate and explain how an identified computer system or process functions. May take the form of an extended writing response, a diagram or a combination of the two. Describe Learners provide an account of something, or highlight a number of key features of a given topic. May also be used in relation to the stages of a process. Develop Learners provide a solution to a problem, typically using an existing system or structure that must be improved or refined. Discuss Learners investigate a problem or scenario, showing reasoning or argument. UNIT 1: PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 28 Command or term Definition Draw Learners represent understanding through the use of a diagram or flowchart. Evaluate Learners review and synthesise information to provide a supported judgement about the topic or problem. Typically a conclusion will be required. Explain Learners make a series of linked points and/or justify or expand on an identified point. Identify Learners assess factual information, typically when making use of given stimuli. Requires a single word or short sentence answer. Produce Learners provide a solution that applies established constructs to a given computing problem. State, name, give Learners assess factual information. Requires a single word or short sentence answer. Write Learners produce a solution, or a mechanism used as part of a solution, to a given computing problem. Links to other units This assessment for this unit should draw on knowledge, understanding and skills developed from: • Unit 2: Fundamentals of Computer Systems • Unit 3: Planning and Management of Computing Projects • Unit 4: Software Design and Development Project • Unit 5: Building Computer Systems • Unit 6: IT Systems Security • Unit 7: IT Systems Security and Encryption • Unit 8: Business Applications of Social • Unit 9: The Impact of Computing • Unit 10: Human-computer Interaction • Unit 18: Relational Database Development • Unit 20: Managing and Supporting Systems • Unit 21: Virtualisation • Unit 22: Systems Analysis and Design • Unit 23: Systems Methodology • Unit 24: Software Development • Unit 26: Programmable Devices and Controllers • Unit 28: Computer Forensics. Employer involvement Centres may involve employers in the delivery of this unit if there are local opportunities. There is no specific guidance related to this unit. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 29 Unit 2: Fundamentals of Computer Systems Level: 3 Unit type: External Guided learning hours: 90 Unit in brief Learners study the fundamental principles of how computer systems work, including the role of hardware and software, the way components of a system work together and how data in a system is used. Unit introduction Knowing how and why computer components, and the data they use, perform in certain ways has a significant impact on the work of all computing professionals. In technical support roles, understanding how different parts of a system integrate facilitates accurate identification of problems and efficient solutions. Professional programmers use their understanding of the way the computer operates to develop more efficient software solutions. In this unit, you will explore the relationship between hardware and software as part of a computer system. You will examine the way computer components work both individually and together to store and process data, and the way in which data is transmitted and used in computer systems. You will explore the impact that computing systems have on organisations and individuals. In this unit, you will apply the fundamental principles of computers to all areas of computing. This is essential for progression to a computing-related higher education course or for entry to the workplace as a computing professional. Summary of assessment This unit is assessed through a written examination set and marked by Pearson. The examination is one hour and 45 minutes in length. During the supervised assessment period, learners will be assessed on their knowledge and understanding of how computer systems work, including the role of hardware and software, the way components of a system work together and how data in a system is used. The number of marks for the unit is 80. The assessment availability is twice a year in January and May/June. The first assessment availability is May/June 2017. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 30 Assessment outcomes AO1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of computing facts, terms, standards, concepts and processes Command words: complete, draw, give, identify, name, state Marks: ranges from 1 to 5 marks AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding of computing facts, terms, standards, concepts and processes to real-life scenarios Command words: calculate, complete, demonstrate, describe, draw, explain, produce Marks: ranges from 1 to 5 marks AO3 Select and use computing technologies and procedures to explore likely outcomes and find solutions to problems in context Command words: calculate, demonstrate, develop, explain, produce Marks: ranges from 1 to 6 marks AO4 Analyse and evaluate data, information, technologies and procedures in order to recommend and justify solutions to computing problems Command words: analyse, demonstrate, discuss, produce, write Marks: ranges from 6 to 12 marks AO5 Make connections between the application of technologies, procedures, outcomes and solutions to resolve computing problems Command words: evaluate, produce, write Marks: ranges from 6 to 12 marks UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 31 Essential content The essential content is set out under content areas. Learners must cover all specified content before the assessment. A Hardware and software The concepts and implications of the use of, and relationships between, hardware and software that form computer systems. A1 Computer hardware in a computer system • Types of computer systems: o multi-functional devices o personal computers o mobile devices o servers. • The purpose, features and uses of internal components used in: o multi-functional devices o personal computers o mobile devices o servers. • Factors affecting the choice, use and performance of internal components. • The hardware used in computer systems: o input devices o output devices o storage devices. • How the features of hardware can affect their performance and the performance of a computer system. • Factors affecting choice of hardware: o user experience – ease of use, performance, availability, accessibility o user needs o compatibility o cost o efficiency o implementation – timescales, testing, migration to new system o productivity o security. • Data storage and recovery systems: o redundant array of independent disks (RAID) o network attached storage (NAS). A2 Computer software in a computer system • Operating systems: o types of operating system: – real-time operating system – single-user single task – single-user multi-tasking – multi-user UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 32 o the role of the kernel in controlling and managing system components and tasks: – program execution – interrupts – modes – memory management – multi-tasking – disk access – file systems – device drivers o the role of the operating system in managing: – networking – security o factors affecting the choice and use of user interfaces: – graphical – command line – menu based o factors affecting the choice of operating system o factors affecting the use and performance of an operating system. • Utility software: o the purpose, features and uses of utility software o factors affecting the choice, use and performance of utility software. • Application software: o the purpose, features and uses of application software o factors affecting the choice, use and performance of application software. • The principles and implications of open source operating systems and software. A3 Data processing • The use, features and implications of computer systems for data processing. • The role of hardware in collecting data. • The role of software in collecting data. • Data processing functions: o aggregation o analysis o conversion o reporting o sorting o validation. • The impact on individuals and organisations of using and storing data across multiple computer systems: o access o cost o implementation o productivity o security. • Backup and data recovery procedures. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 33 B Computer architecture The implications of computer architecture models and the impact of the relationships between their component parts. B1 Approaches to computer architecture • The features and characteristics of different computer architecture models: o stored program model: – Von Neumann architecture – Harvard architecture o cluster computing o uniform memory access and non-uniform memory access. • Use and application of emulation. • Factors affecting the choice of different architecture models. • The impact of using different architecture models. B2 The concepts of microarchitecture • Instruction cycles. • Execution speeds: o factors affecting execution speeds o methods of increasing execution speed o implications of execution speeds. • The use and choice of instruction sets. • Pipelining. • Cache. • Registers. • Multi-processing and multi-threading. • The features and implications of embedded and mobile central processing unit (CPU) architecture. • The features and implications of microcomputer CPU architecture. • The features and implications of server CPU architecture. B3 Registers and register handling • Types of register: o general purpose register o special registers: – accumulator – instruction register – memory address register (MAR) – memory data register (MDR) – program counter. • The function and purpose of general and special registers and their impact on the way computer systems perform. • The role of interrupts in a computer system. C How data is represented by computer systems The characteristics, concepts and implications of computer data representation methods. C1 Number systems • The use and interpretation of number systems used in computer systems, including: o units of digital data (bit, byte, kilobyte and multiples of these) o binary o binary coded decimal (BCD). • The use of binary arithmetic (including BCD) to perform calculations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. • The use of binary to represent negative and floating point numbers. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 34 C2 Text representation • The purpose and implications of using codes to represent character sets. • The features and uses of common character sets: o ASCII o UNICODE. C3 Image representation • How bitmap/raster image data is stored and represented in a computer system. • The impact of image resolution on the way images are stored and represented. • The impact of sample/bit depth on the way that image data is stored and images are displayed. • The effects of compression on image data. D How data is organised on computer systems The characteristics and implications of methods of organising data in computer systems, and its impact on computer processes. D1 Data structures • The features, applications and implications of data types used in computer systems: o stack o queue o array o list. • The use and application of data types in computer software. • The use and implications of data types in computer hardware. D2 Indices and matrices Matrix representation in computer systems: • the relationship between matrices and arrays • mathematical operations using matrices • single, two- and multi-dimensional arrays • row-major and column-major order. E How data is transmitted by computer systems The concepts, processes and implications of data transmission in and between computer systems. E1 Transmitting data • Types of communication channel: o simplex o half-duplex o full-duplex o point-to-point o multi-drop. • Methods of connecting devices and transmitting data across and between computer systems. • The selection of connection methods to fulfil specified tasks and functions. • Asynchronous and synchronous data transmission. • Parallel and serial transmission. • Use of packet data in transmitting data: o contents of a data packet o the role of components of a data packet o packet switching. • Protocols used to govern and control data transmission. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 35 • The features, applications and implications of encryption o simple encryption ciphers: – Caesar cipher – Vigenère cipher o encryption used in computer systems: – symmetric key encryption – public key encryption. • Types of compression: o lossy o lossless. • The applications and implications of data compression. E2 Error detection • Methods used to detect errors in data transmission: o parity schemes o checksum o repetition schemes o cyclic redundancy check (CRC). • The concepts, implications and applications of error detection. E3 Error correction • Commonly-used error correction systems: o automatic repeat request (ARQ) o forward error correction (FEC). • The concepts, implications and applications of error correction systems. F The use of logic and data flow in computer systems The use, application and interpretation of logical processes and diagrams to represent data flow and relationships in and between computer systems. F1 Boolean logic • The use, application and interpretation of Boolean logic to identify data flow and solve problems. • The use, application and interpretation of Boolean logic to identify logical structures, represent data flow and solve problems. F2 Flow charts and system diagrams • The use, application and interpretation of flow charts and diagrams to represent data flow in and between computer systems. • The use, application and interpretation of flow charts and diagrams to solve problems. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 36 Grade descriptors To achieve a grade a learner is expected to demonstrate these attributes across the essential content of the unit. The principle of best fit will apply in awarding grades. Level 3 Pass Learners are able to apply knowledge and understanding of key computing concepts to a range of familiar vocational contexts. They are able to use knowledge of computing to deconstruct problems in common situations and apply standard conventions to produce solutions with interpretation. Leaners are able to identify the impact of effective and ineffective computer systems and recommend ways in which a system can be developed and/or improved (using given structures and criteria). Level 3 Distinction Learners are able to analyse complex information, data and situations, in vocational contexts, in order to draw conclusions and make valid observations. They are able to synthesise knowledge and understanding of computing to deconstruct problems, drawing on various sources of information to develop effective solutions with justification. Learners are able to evaluate the effectiveness of computer systems to make justified recommendations on their development and future actions that can be taken. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 37 Key terms typically used in assessment The following table shows the key terms that will be used consistently by Pearson in our assessments to ensure students are rewarded for demonstrating the necessary skills. Please note: the list below will not necessarily be used in every paper/session and is provided for guidance only. Command or term Definition Analyse Learners examine in detail, a scenario or problem to discover its meaning or essential features. Learners will break down the problem into its parts and show how they interrelate. There is no requirement for any conclusion. Calculate Learners apply some form of mathematical or computational process. Complete Learners complete a diagram or process. Can apply to problems/solutions of varying complexity. Demonstrate Learners illustrate and explain how an identified computer system or process functions. May take the form of an extended writing response, a diagram or a combination of the two. Describe Learners provide an account of something, or to highlight a number of key features of a given topic. May also be used in relation to the stages of a process. Develop Learners provide a solution to a problem, typically using an existing system or structure that must be improved or refined. Discuss Learners investigate a problem or scenario, showing reasoning or argument. Draw Learners represent understanding through the use of a diagram or flow chart. Evaluate Learners review and synthesise information to provide a supported judgement about the topic or problem. Typically a conclusion will be required. Explain Learners make a series of linked points and/or justify or expand on an identified point. Identify Learners assess factual information, typically when making use of given stimuli. Requires a single word or short sentence answer. Produce Learners provide a solution that applies established constructs to a given computing problem. Write Learners produce a solution, or a mechanism used as part of a solution, to a given computing problem. UNIT 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 38 Links to other units This mandatory unit supports most of the other units in the qualification and, in particular, the following mandatory units: • Unit 3: Planning and Management of Computer Projects • Unit 4: Software Design and Development Project • Unit 7: IT Systems Security and Encryption • Unit 9: The Impact of Computing. Employer involvement Centres may involve employers in the delivery of this unit if there are local opportunities. There is no specific guidance related to this unit. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 39 Unit 3: Planning and Management of Computing Projects Level: 3 Unit type: External Guided learning hours: 120 Unit in brief Learners study how project planning and management concepts are applied to computing projects. Unit introduction A project is created for the purpose of delivering one or more business products according to an agreed business case. Good planning and management skills are essential to ensure that an end product can be delivered on time, within budget and to the required specification. This unit explores the business case needed for the initial approval of a computing solution to meet organisational needs. It will provide you with the skills associated with project planning and management: task scheduling, budgeting, risk management, time management, quality management, and communication with all stakeholders throughout the life cycle of the project. To complete the assessment task within this unit, you will need to draw on your learning from across your programme. In this unit, you will apply project planning and management techniques to a computing project scenario. This will develop your knowledge and understanding of the role of a computing project management professional, and support your progression to higher education studies. Summary of assessment This unit is assessed through a task set and marked by Pearson. The set task will be completed under supervised conditions in two sessions during the assessment period timetabled by Pearson. Part A will last three hours and Part B will last two hours. The set task will assess learners’ ability to plan and manage a computing project. Information about the project is released to learners at the start of each session. The number of marks for the unit is 66. The assessment availability is December/January and May/June each year. The first assessment availability is December 2017/January 2018. Sample assessment materials will be available to help centres prepare learners for assessment. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 40 Assessment outcomes AO1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the project planning and management concepts, processes and life cycle AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding of computing management tools, techniques and procedures to explore outcomes and find solutions to problems AO3 Analyse data and information; recognise patterns, correlations and connections in order to solve problems and predict outcomes AO4 Evaluate project planning and management tools, techniques, procedures, outcomes and solutions to make reasoned judgements and decisions AO5 Be able to plan a computing project and manage it throughout its life cycle, with appropriate justification UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 41 Essential content The essential content is set out under content areas. Learners must cover all specified content before the assessment. A Project management concepts The key factors, processes and stages that make up a typical computing project. A1 Costs and timescales How key factors can be used to determine project viability and measure progress and success: • project budget • setting milestones and deadlines • interim reviews. A2 Quality and deliverables • Application of current quality standards and subsequent iterations: o ISO/IEC 25010:2011 as a benchmark for software development o World Wide Web Consortium (W3C®) for website design and functionality standards. • Defining success criteria and using SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, timebound) objectives to define project outcomes. • Customer requirements in terms of functional requirements and non-functional requirements. • Product description or product breakdown structure, to describe the product to be delivered. A3 Risk • Identifying typical project risks: o external risks o internal risks. • The risk management cycle: o identification of risks o assessing the severity of risks: – 3-point scale for impact and probability – impact multiplied by probability formula o planning – accept the risk, plan contingency or avoid the risk o monitor and control the risks through the project. • Handling issues: when a risk occurs and is dealt with using the plan. A4 Benefits The key benefits of a project for the organisation and stakeholders and establishing a measurement of success. • Business benefits: o saving money o maintaining or increasing profits o improving services o growing the business o increasing market share o improving productivity. • Expected return on investment as: o justification for the project o a forecast of project success. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 42 A5 The project life cycle Following the life cycle to start, plan, manage and deliver a project. • Conception and start up: o project mandate o client requirements o project feasibility. • Definition of the project: o set up project team o create the Project Initiation Document (PID). • Planning: o timescales o costs o quality management o risk management and controls. • Launch and execution: o carrying out the plan o monitoring activity o checking progress. • Closure: o handover of the product o user acceptance testing o disbanding project team. • Post-project evaluation: o reviewing the project against success criteria. A6 Professionalism • The codes of conduct developed by professional bodies and their impact on how a project is planned and managed in an ethical way: o Association for Project Management (APM) o British Computer Society (BCS) o Project Management Institute (PMI). • Communication and presentation for project planning and management activities: o appropriate for target audience o conveys intended meaning o effective use of graphics to support meaning o use of fluent English and appropriate technical language o appropriate tone for project documentation. B Starting up a computing project Gathering the key information needed to run a successful project, production of the PID and obtaining authorisation for the project kick-off. B1 Interpreting the business case The business case as a driver of the project: • reasons for the project • options that should be considered • expected business benefits • timescale, including major milestones • budget available • major risks. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 43 B2 Stakeholders Identification of anyone with an interest in the project and allocation of their project responsibilities. • Key stakeholder responsibilities: o project manager – responsible for defining, planning, controlling and leadership o technical teams – responsible for performing the project tasks o team managers – responsible for following company policies and providing resources o project sponsor – provides the authority and guidance, and maintains the priority of the project in the organisation o client – provides the product requirements and project finance. • Other stakeholders: o suppliers – provide materials and equipment o contractors – contribute specialist work o general public – may be affected by the project. B3 Identifying assumptions and constraints • Dealing with assumptions as low-level risks documented at the outset. • Constraints: o deadlines and the time available o funds for the project, including contingency o availability of staff when required o availability of required equipment o technical expertise in the project team o limitations of technology. B4 The Project Initiation Document (PID) • Production of a PID to contain the key management information: o document details o approvals o distribution o purpose of PID o project background, including how the project fits into the organisation o objectives, written as SMART targets o scope, a statement of what is and what is not included in the project o the business case o assumptions o constraints o risk management strategy o deliverables o project quality strategy o stakeholders o representation of the project management team structure as an organisation chart indicating roles o project plan o communication plan o document management. • Communication and presentation requirements in the PID. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 44 C Project planning The process of creating and updating the plans to ensure that the project is completed on time, in budget and to specification. C1 Scheduling and milestones • Work breakdown structure. • Task scheduling and precedence, including serial and parallel scheduling of tasks. • Critical path analysis to identify spare capacity in time schedule. • Gantt charts as a planning and progress tracking tool. • Selection and use of project planning software tools. C2 Resources and budgeting • Resource requirements and allocation: o people and their work allocation o equipment and materials o allocation of work and material resources to tasks o pro rata costing. • Application of estimation techniques to forecast project duration and cost: o bottom-up o parametric, using simplified function point analysis o top-down. • Budget planning and cash flow to organise resource usage. • Use of appropriate software tools: spreadsheets and project planning software. C3 Risk management strategy • Risk analysis process: o use of impact and probability to calculate severity o use of a risk matrix to classify risks as green, amber or red. • Contingency planning for major risks. • Documenting risks using a standard template. • Recording issues: o use of an issues log o cross-referencing to the risk matrix. C4 Quality management Use and application of quality management project processes, techniques and procedures. • Defect removal: o desk checking and proofreading o peer review o inspection and walkthrough. • Testing strategy: o unit testing against unit specifications o integration testing against designs o systems testing against requirements o regression testing. • Use of quality standards as an external benchmark. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 45 C5 Communications Identification of appropriate communication methods and frequency requirements. • Methods for project team communication: o meetings and one-to-one discussions o memos and notices o telephone conversations and video conferences o emails and instant messaging o online forums, discussion groups and news groups o collaborative working tools. • Devising a communication plan: o frequency of communication o target audience o agendas and minutes o communication and presentation requirements. D Executing and monitoring a project Running a live project, keeping track of progress and dealing with problems or changes to the project. D1 The waterfall software development life cycle model Use of the model to inform the stages of a project plan. • Requirements analysis. • Design. • Construction and testing. • Acceptance testing. • Implementation and delivery. D2 Monitoring and tracking progress • Project baseline and variance. • Monitoring and recording progress. • Checkpoint reports as a way of recording milestones achieved. • Monitoring risk and managing issues. • Recording quality management activity. D3 Managing issues Categorisation of issues, taking action and recording activity as part of the risk management process. • Categorising issues: o request for change o off-specification o problem or concern. • Management by exception: reporting unforeseen issues to the project sponsor and the potential impact on the project. • Recording lessons learned. D4 Change management The management of project changes triggered by the occurrence of an issue. • Impact on the project: o entire project o stage(s) of project. • Change of scope for: o requirements and effects on quality o costs o timescales. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 46 • Development changes, handling modifications to designs. • Dealing with faults: o defects in analysis and design documentation o software errors. • The change management process: o change request submitted by project manager o review of the change request by management team o assessing feasibility of the change of scope o approval or rejection by management team o implementation of change by project team. D5 Implementation strategy Product delivery options as agreed with the client. • Choice dependent on size and complexity of system: o direct changeover o parallel running o pilot changeover o user acceptance testing as part of the quality and review process. E Project closure and post-project review E1 Closing a live project Completing a project in an organised and controlled way. • Moving into operation and maintenance phase. • Assessing the benefits delivered and plan to review again later. • Closing down risk log, issue log, quality log. • Summarising and reviewing the lessons learned. E2 Review of project success Determining a project’s success in terms of key factors, SMART objectives and views of stakeholders. • Review of lessons learned. • Review project performance against the baseline and project objectives. • Review of final cost, delivery date and quality of product delivered. • Review feedback from key stakeholders: o sponsor o clients o end users o development team. • Methods to obtain feedback and their advantages and disadvantages: o interviews o questionnaires o surveys o observation of resulting processes. • Recommendations for future actions based on the outcome of the post-project review. • Communication and presentation requirements for reviews. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 47 Grade descriptors To achieve a grade a learner is expected to demonstrate these attributes across the essential content of the unit. The principle of best fit will apply in awarding grades. Level 3 Pass Learners are able to use their knowledge of project planning, management concepts and processes and the application of problem-solving skills to show the documenting of project planning and management requirements. These are limited in scope and may be incomplete. Learners are able to use planning and management documentation, and demonstrate an understanding of their completion and development to a minimal level of acceptability in order to support an organisation’s project. Their evaluation of a given project planning and management scenario is limited in scope and may be incomplete. Level 3 Distinction Learners demonstrate that they can evaluate a given project planning and management problem, and develop a detailed and complex project planning and management documented solution to effectively meet all project scenario requirements. Learners demonstrate an in-depth understanding of project planning and management documentation requirements and are able to show that they fully understand how these are used to produce an effective project solution. They are able to evaluate their solution in order to make justified recommendations on project development and future actions. UNIT 3: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTING PROJECTS Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Computing – Specification – Issue 4 – August 2018 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 48 Key terms typically used in assessment The following table shows the key terms that will be used consistently by Pearson in our assessments to ensure students are rewarded for demonstrating the necessary skills. Please note: the list below will not necessarily be used in every paper/session and is provided for guidance only. Command or term Definition Function point A way of measuring the amount of work taken to implement part of a software system, for example it might take 10 developer hours to implement a search function. Gantt chart A bar chart which provides a graphical illustration of a schedule that helps to plan, coordinate and track all the tasks in a project against a baseline. Lessons learned A summary report which brings together any insights gained during a project that can be usefully applied on future projects. This includes factors and actions that supported success, and learning from what did not go well. Modules Part of a large software system that carries out a specific business role; for example different departments will use different modules within a full system, i.e. Human Resources will use a payroll module to calculate staff wages. During development each module is likely to be built and tested independently, often by different groups of developers and testers. Operating system Software that manages computer hardware and software resources, and also provides common services for computer programs. Project kick-off The official launch of the project; the point at which details of the project are promoted. The kick-off will only happen after some initial investigation to establish that the project is viable, such as: Can the client afford it? Can it be done in the timescale? Is it technically possible? Regression testing A type of software testing that seeks to uncover new software bugs, or regressions in existing functional and non-functional areas of a system after changes, such as enhancements, patches or configuration changes have been made to them. Resource list A list of all the staff, equipment and raw materials required for a project, along with their associated costs. Staff will usually have an hourly rate or annual salary, while equipment and materials will usually be fixed cost
     

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